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Dust Catchers

Author(s): Nancy Moreno, PhD, Barbara Tharp, MS, and Judith Dresden, MS.

The Science of Dust and Air Particles

Dust consists of individual particles of different substances, such as animal dander, tobacco smoke, and dust mites. Even air that appears to be clean may contain dust and other pollutants. And while we may think most air pollutants are concentrated outdoors, energy-efficient building designs can cause levels of some contaminants to be higher indoors. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that 30% of all buildings and homes in the United States contain enough pollutants to affect people’s health by causing allergic reactions, infectious diseases, chronic irritation of the airways, and even toxic reactions (including damage to tissues and organs, including the liver, central nervous system, and the immune system). 


Funded by the following grant(s)

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH

The Environment as a Context for Opportunities in Schools
Grant Numbers: 5R25ES010698, R25ES06932


Houston Endowment Inc.

Houston Endowment Inc.

Foundations for the Future: Capitalizing on Technology to Promote Equity, Access and Quality in Elementary Science Education