Skip Navigation
Search

How Much Water Do Humans Need?

Author(s): Nancy P. Moreno, PhD, Barbara Z. Tharp, MS, and Judith Dresden, MS.

Extensions

The threat of water loss from the body is especially significant for animals living in very dry environments. Most of these animals have evolved special strategies to conserve water. Kangaroo rats living in deserts, for example, hardly ever drink water. They obtain almost all the water they need through the chemical breakdown of the grains they eat. To reduce water loss from their bodies, kangaroo rats are not active during the hottest parts of the day. They also produce very dry feces and release extremely concentrated urine. Use resources in the library or on the Internet to investigate some of the unique characteristics of desert dwellers.

Aquatic organisms (plants and animals that live in water) have a very different problem: too much water. See what you can learn about strategies used by aquatic organisms to survive while submerged.


Funded by the following grant(s)

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH

The Environment as a Context for Opportunities in Schools
Grant Numbers: 5R25ES010698, R25ES06932


Houston Endowment Inc.

Houston Endowment Inc.

Foundations for the Future: Capitalizing on Technology to Promote Equity, Access and Quality in Elementary Science Education