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Saving Baby Elephants from a Lethal Virus

Saving Baby Elephants from a Lethal Virus

Paul D. Ling, Ph.D., a microbiologist at Baylor College of Medicine, is a leading global expert on elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus, a disease that is killing baby Asian elephants. Join Dr. Ling as he discusses the virus, key discoveries, and a treatment protocol developed by his research team to help keep infected elephants alive.

To view Dr. Ling’s presentation video, Saving Baby Elephants from a Lethal Virus, click the “Associated Video” button.

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Author(s): Paul D. Ling, Ph.D.
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Saving Baby Elephants from a Lethal Virus

Baby Elephants are Supposed to Look Like This

Overview

EEHV Causes Blood Vessel Leakage

Elephant Herpesvirus-associated Pathology

Types of Herpesviruses

EEHV in the News

Reports and Scientific Investigations

EEHV Threatens Stability of Captive Herds

Why Am I Involved?

Translational Project: Bench to Barn

Blood Samples and Trunk Washes

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Funded by the following grant(s)

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH

Development of The index Elephant teaching materials and video resources was supported in part by funds from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, grant numbers R25 AI084826 and R25 AI097453.

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